Grizzly Gazette

Bye Bye Dessert: A Fudge of a Problem for the Cocoa Bean

From+upper+left+colckwise%3A+Teacher+Daniel+Tena%2C+and+Grizzlies+Vanessa+Aranda+Jesse+Cedejas+and+Julian+Reyes+enjoy+their+favorite+chocolate+bars.
From upper left colckwise: Teacher Daniel Tena, and Grizzlies Vanessa Aranda Jesse Cedejas and Julian Reyes enjoy their favorite chocolate bars.

From upper left colckwise: Teacher Daniel Tena, and Grizzlies Vanessa Aranda Jesse Cedejas and Julian Reyes enjoy their favorite chocolate bars.

Photo collage by Laura Horta

Photo collage by Laura Horta

From upper left colckwise: Teacher Daniel Tena, and Grizzlies Vanessa Aranda Jesse Cedejas and Julian Reyes enjoy their favorite chocolate bars.

Laura Horta, Staff Writer

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Sweet, delicious, and addictive.

Chocolate is the richest candy you’ll ever taste. And it’s everywhere. Brownies, cakes, candies, chocolate milk, hot chocolate, cookies, and ice cream.

But what if isn’t on the shelves for long? Chocolate is dying. Well, not exactly.

Due to climate change there have been major farming issues with cocoa bean crops.

Cocoa beans are planted in hot areas ranging from 60 to 95 degrees in wet areas. Mexico, Nigeria, Hawaii, the Philippines, and other heated areas grow the beans. Cocoa beans aren’t used to higher temperature.

According to the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric, the climate where beans are grown continues to have increasing temperatures that ultimately could end chocolate by 2050.

Huge chocolate industries are trying their best to solve this issue. Farmers have tried to relocate their crops, yet to grow this plant, they have to terminate thousands of acres of wildlife.

The University of California at Berkeley is working with the company Mars; who owns Dove, M&M’s, Twix, and other chocolate brands, to develop cocoa beans that withstand warmer temperatures. Their plan is to use CRISPR known as the “Controversial Gene Editing Technology.” This technology modifies the DNA sequence and gene function. Yet this troublesome machinery can eradicate human disease and “designer babies,” according to the research article by Sophie Curtis.

It could potentially change the game of growing cocoa beans.

Cocoa beans are in dire need of assistance. Climate change is preventable. If you want to prevent cocoa beans from dying you could limit the release of unhealthy gases. Bonfires is a start, no need to make s’mores. Eat healthy food (technically cocoa beans are a vegetable so that’s a pass).

Now enjoy as much chocolate as you can this Valentine’s Day. It won’t be here for too long. Or at least till 2050.

15 Comments

15 Responses to “Bye Bye Dessert: A Fudge of a Problem for the Cocoa Bean”

  1. No on February 14th, 2018 9:51 am

    oh

    [Reply]

  2. hello on February 14th, 2018 2:13 pm

    Jairo whose

    [Reply]

  3. Micaela on February 26th, 2018 9:18 am

    The issue relating with climate change goes back to affect products people may never think it would impact, and in this case chocolate. This laudable topic may have the concern of many people who have a common interest for loving chocolate. So, if people still want to keep their beloved sweets, then there would need to be change made and the recognition for it. In order to obtain and keep chocolate still, then the first steps of eschewing from releasing any unhealthy gases is a great start.

    [Reply]

  4. Kimberly Alia on February 26th, 2018 9:32 am

    This article not only catches my attention of there being less chocolate but the fact that global warming is the cause of it. It goes to show we need to keep our environment healthy and that global warming affects many things in our life. Starting with the small things such as cocoa beans which then leads to bigger things. All the companies that produce chocolate are at a small risk.

    [Reply]

  5. Jose Serrano on February 26th, 2018 9:38 am

    Although it may seem like it is hard to accomplish, I feel like preventing climate change and the extinction of chocolate is feasible if everyone works together and stops releasing unhealthy gases that are killing the cocoa beans. To help out, I will turn off the lights in my house when they are not needed and use less electricity.

    [Reply]

  6. Guadalupe Leonides on February 26th, 2018 10:38 am

    Personally, I’m a lover of chocolate and hearing this news breaks my heart because we are the reason that caused this. I am glad that researchers are trying to find a way plant and grow more of these cocoa beans. I know for sure if the cocoa bean stops producing, a plethora of people will be demanding chocolate and other sweet treats. Although it sounds unfamiliar, I sure hope that their plan to use CRISPR functions well. Since we don’t grow the plants ourselves, maybe we could help this solution by limiting the release of unhealthy gases as mentioned in the article. I know this is a delicious and sweet treat I enjoy, so I hope they find a new way to grow it.

    [Reply]

  7. Adina Crespo on February 26th, 2018 12:07 pm

    From all the years, companies like Hershey’s have been eminent with their tasteful chocolates they produced, it seems quite devasting to the consumers in this situation, of any kind of chocolate not being produced anymore due to the lack of cocoa beans. In the future I hope they find ways to keeps cocoa beans from becoming extinct, I feel that global warming, and the dangerous chemicals that are being produced in factories, also contributed to the cocoa beans not being able to grow and produce.

    [Reply]

  8. Moises Cerda on February 26th, 2018 12:17 pm

    This laudable article can help increase the awareness of the cocoa beans. It will be hard to eschew the need for sweets. I even think for myself that it will be hard to not have any chocolate sweets. Overall great article to inform students of cocoa bean farms.

    [Reply]

  9. Frankie Castelan on February 26th, 2018 12:24 pm

    Its the worth of affluent health for many people. Chocolate has been with us since we were small and it’s the most favorite candy in the world. It’s disappointing because it will be gone for the future kids and they won’t taste the goodness of chocolate. The climate has changed a lot the past years. It is derided that many people won’t even talk about chocolate when it’s about to end in 32 years.

    [Reply]

  10. Stephanie Dominguez on February 27th, 2018 9:00 am

    I love chocolate and it’d be disappointing if it disappears. I know it’s not healthy but chocolate is the best. I hope they find a solution to not make it disappear. Thank you for informing us on this.

    [Reply]

  11. Julian Blanco on February 27th, 2018 10:18 am

    In my opinion, not having chocolate wont affect me that much. I like chocolate, but I don´t need it. One thing this will affect is the companies that grow the cocoa plant and the companies that sell chocolate. Furthermore, this is caused by global warming, which is a problem. Hopefully, global warming can be delayed as much as possible. In conclusion, the cocoa plant is a big part of cuisine across the world and hopefully it is not affected too much.

    [Reply]

  12. Maria Nieto on February 27th, 2018 10:29 am

    This seems very unfortunate but I don’t think I will give up having bonfires. Yes, it badgers me that cocoa beans are dying but we can live without chocolate. There might even be some benefits to the decrease of chocolates, such as healthy diets.

    [Reply]

  13. Samantha Alarcon on February 27th, 2018 10:47 am

    Over the past year, I have noticed the disdain people have for the environment, that they rarely care about. The end of cocoa bean would be the first step to a life-changing problem that we need to solve. We need to work as a community and put an end this disaster we have upon us.

    [Reply]

  14. Jacquelyn Carrera on February 27th, 2018 10:49 am

    This seems very unfortunate because chocolate is a dessert many people love. Therefore, chocolate is no longer going to exist because there is not enough cocoa beans to make any more later on throughout the years. Sadly no one can stop the voracious apetite for chocolate.

    [Reply]

  15. JaeLyn Sandoval-Rios on March 28th, 2018 11:31 am

    In this interesting article, it states that global warming may affect the existence of chocolate. It has been said that global warming is causing many problems around the world, but most people do nothing about it. The effect of no action being enforced is the termination of the sweet-savory treat that almost everyone loves. This has caused distraught throughout the world.

    [Reply]

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Bye Bye Dessert: A Fudge of a Problem for the Cocoa Bean